Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Tech Talk Tuesday Part 1

 Go WIDE for the WOW factor
If you've followed my blog for long, you know that I often talk about looking for ways to make my photographs stand out in one way or another from the average snapshot.  Sometimes it's the color, sometimes it's the composition, sometimes it's the angle, sometimes is fancy post editing.  All designed to make a photo interesting enough so the viewer sticks around to enjoy it longer.  (I know, I keep repeating myself!)  Another way to do this is to use your various lenses in unique or creative ways.  The photo in the last post, and this one were both taken with a 16-35 mm wide angle lens.   Wide angle lenses have great DOF (depth of field), so they are sharper from very close to the camera to infinity, and they take in more of the view than a normal lens.  They also make objects in the foreground larger, and those in the background appear farther away.  Some common uses for a wide angle lens are when you want to show a grand landscape vista, or maybe get all the people in a crowded room in the same shot, or my excuse to buy a wide angle lens, to take photos of the inside of houses (I'm a Realtor).  One technique I love, is creating the illusion that the object nearest the camera is much larger than it actually is which changes one's normal perspective and so makes for a unique look.  This automatically tells the viewer what the main subject of the photo is, while making everything behind the subject appear smaller and farther away,  creating a supporting backdrop.  These flowers were actually small, but they look unusually large and take center stage in this composition.  First I put my camera on aperture priority and choose the smallest aperture my camera and lens will allow, (large number such as f/22).  I chose a day with no wind and used a tripod.  My camera was probably only a few inches away from the foreground flower, but I focused on a flower about a third of the distance into the scene (hyperfocal distance).  This gave me the best chance of having everything in focus from flower closest to me, to the mountains in the background.  (Obviously, if I'd wanted the background to be out of focus I'd have used a large aperture.)  Hope this gives some of you another tool for your 'creative' photography tool box.       

10 comments:

Robin said...

Karen, you have a great talent in explaining things! I am basically self taught and some of these things are difficult to grasp. You explanations are easy to follow.
Thanks

bicocacolors said...

what a beautiful pictures
what a beautiful blog!!
greetings from Spain

A Life In Focus Photography said...

i didn't know about focusing 1/3 the way in the photo...thanks for sharing that. i someday want the lens, after a few more senior sessions...maybe.

Don said...

Beautiful photo! I feel like I'm right there.

Ginny said...

Well, I don't have an SLR camera, but I know Sandra is trying out all these differnt things. Mine is a Nikon P80, in between. You are truly a master at what you do!

joey said...

Stunning photo and great advice, Karen. Thanks you, dear photography friend, for sharing.

Denise said...

It is a magnificent photo Karen and I value all this great advice. Thank you.

Rick said...

I just got a wide angle lens (10-22mm on a 1.6 crop factor camera) and am learning how to use it. Good advice here - thanks for sharing. Oh, and lovely shot too !!

janc@mac.com said...

Great advice to enjoy reading even for a non photographer like me.

ruma said...

The quiet beauty shine in Nature. . .

I feel their strength.




From Japan.
Thank you.
ruma